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20120925
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between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view p
partnering of life science firms. today we'll start the clock on what we'll hope will be a longlar of collaboration between bay area and the most innovative companies in the area. before we introduce the first companies to occupy the area -- -- >> thank you, terry. i guess as everybody knows here, bayer has next year a history of 150 years' of successful r&d. i can assure everybody things have changed how we do r&d over the past 150 years, some things remain the same, which is you need great people talking to each other, networking and when we took a little while ago the decision to move here, it was for very simple reason. we understood that director kelly was not willing to move the whole qb3 do richmond. [ laughter ] as a consequence we wanted to have our scientists in the midst of wonderful, very inspiring campus. however, we never really gave up on the idea of getting creative young people, young start-ups to us. and this is now happening today. establishing the collaborator will mean that we'll attract young companies working together with us on a great campus, getting i
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tenn
, african-american, latino, islanders specifically were not given those classes, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american mi
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
growth and in our history. the next is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two ears in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to
francisco college student majoring in political science. i am the youth commissioner for district 10 appointed by supervisor malea cohen. i spent time in group homes and two consecutive years in juvenile hall. since then i've come a long way and thankful for being part of the youth commission in addition to working with the juvenile department. we heard from the youth and what they expect from the m-o-u. we share similar concerns to how you'ring out feel. we believe that including youth in the selection and valuation of the sro [speaker not understood] between our youth and officers. we, too, believe that adequate training for our police on how to deal with the city's young people will ensure safety between the police and our youth. in our historical joint hearing between the police and the youth commission on march 7th of this year we had three simple recommendations that were agreed to by the chief. one of which included an updated m-o-u and i have three here for you so you guys can see. one of which included an updated m-o-u in addition to a widespread pamphlet and training for of
science. but in the end, broke my grand mother's heart was her 2 daughters could not come for their brother's funeral. when it explained to her that my aunts who lived in india and pack tan were considered enemy aliens we looked at us as we were inmates. we are brothers and sisters all of them are my children and went to grieve in the privacy of her prayers. we were quiet for sometime, both of us try to break away from the sounds of bombs and the sounds of grieve that accompany the tearing apart of people. 1 from the other. amy broke our silence. what do you mean pieces of your doll. i had 3 dolls all 3 were shanty. all 3 dolls were made of brittle plastic like material we called cutcha caw. they were hollow the different parts of their bodies were hooked with rubber bands. whatever held those 3 parts together they always broke within a few weeks and the dolls continued to exist in their separate components. i suspect my male cousin was the deconductor of the dolls. the grownups promised to reconstruct them but didn't have the time to follow up on their promises or forgot
to begin a new and here there are no science the deaths are not as severe the pure ifkification not complete. to let the natural of the sun have it's way with me. to feel the tips of grass force through the ashes of earth the complicated earth that seechls soft at the surface and yet so deep. that is how i feel the hidden layers of hardness, liquid and flame. can anything survive at the core. must i always hold people at a distance never let them settle inside me. mother there is not enough room for me in your womb. that's why i left. to seek a home a place where i could grow. 165 miles i crieds, 165 times i missed you today. 165 meals that did not satisfy. 165 was not the number of my dorm room. 165 dollars for a 1 way ticket. 651 the area code home. >> this is a record. phone rings, a set in mother tone asks, what are you eating, how are you getting around? warns me to lock all the locks on the door. my voice plays over and over half truths with fragmented vietnamese. i don't tell her that the locks have already been locked the click, click change of chain to groove. i don't
artistic needs. we are lucky to have golden gate park. the museum and the academy of sciences and so many other institutions. but also, a lot of community arts centers. there is all these community arts space is that i just love, and it makes our neighborhoods a much more colorful and livable as well. >> what motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign proces
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
in the science laboratory lab, two girls are discussing their project. >> you don't even know what you are doing the -- doing. you're dumb. >> you test too much. >> the day has come. the projects are to be returned. >> see, i told you? mine was the best. i told you, dummy. besides, let me see what you guys have. >> you know, i'm leaving. after school, alice and delores park thinking about human behavior. >> i don't know what people want to -- from me, for real. i have to say i think people just want me to be perfect. but you know what? i am capable of doing anything. it doesn't matter who i am or the way i look. what matters is the effort. i will study more. >> alice studied hard. she gets automatic a's. she's on the honor roll! -- she gets all a's. she's on the honor roll. >> oh, my god. i can't believe it? you see? i am capeable. don't call me dummy. now who do you think schnur i am a girl with just good grades. >> the morale of this story is that no matter what people think about you, all you have to do is show who you really are. even if the situation isn't good for you, you must make the be
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
. we know from the science that chemicals are ending up where they are not supposed to be and that is inside of our bodies. scientists can measure the chemicals getting into us, bio measuring. this is from the first chapter, indecent exposure, the intimate details. charlotte was surprised by the test results. mother of 2 among the first people to be tested for a wide range of industrial chemicals. test revealed that her body contained mercury lead cosmetics. i felt violated charlotte reported. she was upset about the pesticide. i never used them in my house, never on my lawn. i bought organic whenever i could. her body contained several variations of organic chlorines designed to attack nervous systems of insects. i never bought it. isn't that trespassing. i tell this in my story of mary broon. mary never felt called to be an environmentalist she was nursing her 6 month daughter olivia and a story had been done by texas tech where they looked at breast milk samples, all were contaminated with rocket fuel. i was stunned, i thought breast milk was as pure as it came fo
some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at the california academy of sciences, there is a very large collection of preserved and live specimens, which are the evidence about evolution. we have the assassin spiders, which are spiders that exclusively kill and eat other spiders. they are under the microscope here. research done and the california academy's i rhinology lab suggests that the assassin spiders have been doing this for over 150 million years. this glassed in room is a real scientific laboratory, and the people in that room are preparing specimens of vertebrate, that is mammals and birds. the way they do this is to remove the skin, sew it together in a relatively lifelike pose, and ensure that it does not decompose. >> i am a really big class actress fan, so i am here to see them, and beer week. >> i wanted to learn something and have fun. >> i always enjoy it. i am not all is well -- always working as i am tonight. sometimes i come to enjoy the music and to dance. ♪ >> culturewire covers the arts in san francisco, and one of my favorite culture artists is here tonig
as they went along, everything from soil science to irrigation techniqu. and before they knew it, they had developed a thriving avocado orchard along the way. they now have 8,500 avocado trees, trees that have come to mean more to the couple than they ever could have imagined. >> we like to think that we have 8,500 employees working for us here at the facility on our area. and we like to think of every tree as really an individual with its own personality. >> my husband calls them employees, but they're kind of like my babies. and anytime anything happens to them we feel horrible. and you see when a tree is stressed and you have to take care of it. and if any of them die, you feel bad. you feel really bad. so you want to take care of them as best you can. > and those 8,500 employees continue to work hard for linda and mark who continue to dote on them. they hope to harvest about 15,000 pounds of fruit per acre this season alone. ea@h avocado is handpicked, making sure the stem is trimmed off so it doesn't scrape or bruise other avocados when it is packed. and then the fruit is driven here
know, i'm not that familiar with all of the different science associated with different dietary restrictions and other types of things. you can certainly reduce the instance of aggression in animal models by putting them on different diets. you can make them more likely to be aggressive, for example, by changing diets. i have a sister who is a nutritionist around the corner. she would kill me if i didn't tell you to eat right, you know. [laughter] >> that being said, i do believe that deficits in certain essential aminnow acids and other types of things can certainly increase people's impulsivity. they can increase people's chances of not -- of those types of things, yeah. >> and one final question and i'm going to rephrase it a little bit, but why is it that we treat people who have, say, traumatic brain injuries or other diagnosed mental illnesses in the criminal justice system rather than in the mental health system? [applause] >> so what i showed you today was to give you that exact what is neuroscience doing in the legal is system and so that person of the person with the t
said to me in different occasions i got to use what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping your ideas about how do we really engage the authentic student voices and not only at high school lev
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)